Tuesday, July 29, 2014

"I no longer love her, that’s certain, but how I loved her.
My voice tried to find the wind to touch her hearing.

Another’s. She will be another’s. Like my kisses before.
Her void. Her bright body. Her inifinite eyes.

I no longer love her, that’s certain, but maybe I love her. 
Love is so short, forgetting is so long.”

- an excerpt from “Tonight I Can Write The Saddest Lines” by Pablo Neruda

 

I don’t love you as if you were the salt-rose, topaz or arrow of carnations that propagate fire: I love you as certain dark things are loved, secretly, between the shadow and the soul.

I love you as the plant that doesn’t bloom and carries hidden within itself the light of those flowers, and thanks to your love, darkly in my body lives the dense fragrance that rises from the earth.

I love you without knowing how, or when, or from where, I love you simply, without problems or pride: I love you in this way because I don’t know any other way of loving

but this, in which there is no I or you, so intimate that your hand upon my chest is my hand, so intimate that when I fall asleep it is your eyes that close.

Pablo Neruda, 100 Love Sonnets, Sonnet XVII,  1960 (via bookmania)

His art was suggested by a friend. This one is my favorite so far.

Running was a brief reprieve - releasing me from the hold my thoughts have had over me today. Writing isn’t an option. My mind is so muddled. These 4 sentences alone took 10 minutes. Reading seems to be my last hope. Maybe romanticizing my reality is the breather I need. Here’s hoping.

Sunday, July 27, 2014

Movies give nice guys happy endings so nice guys in real life don’t kill themselves when they don’t get theirs, 

The worst part is I really do like being detached and a loner..until I don’t anymore.

I’ll keep trying, though. Being alone is much worse than feeling alone.

I never know if I did well or not. So, I just assume the worst and put the walls back up. It’s selfish to ask for transparency when I don’t provide it myself, but ultimately I’m just looking to be myself again.

Thursday, July 24, 2014
cinephiliabeyond:

Dear every filmmaker, read this: an utterly brilliant series of articles by Film School Rejects’ Scott Beggs called 6 Filmmaking Tips From… It’s powerful knowledge — straight from the source.
Martin Scorsese
Alfred Hitchcock
David Fincher
Stanley Kubrick
Billy Wilder
Steven Spielberg
The Coen Brothers
Wes Anderson
Ridley Scott
David Cronenberg
Pixar
Nora Ephron
Aaron Sorkin
Michael Haneke
Christopher Nolan
Jon Jost
John Ford
Charlie Kaufman
Sylvester Stallone
Tony Scott
Frank Darabont
Monty Python
Werner Herzog
Paul Thomas Anderson

Joss Whedon
Rian Johnson
Wes Craven
John Carpenter
Dario Argento
The Wachowskis
Steven Soderbergh
George Lucas
Peter Jackson
Kathryn Bigelow
Quentin Tarantino
Sundance Directors
Harold Lloyd
John McTiernan
Oscar Winning Directors
Ang Lee
Danny Boyle
Harmony Korine
Dennis Hopper
Sam Raimi
Shane Black
Richard Linklater
Alejandro Jodorowsky
Guillermo del Toro
Sam Peckinpah
Akira Kurosawa

Edgar Wright
Wong Kar-Wai
Robert Altman
James Wan
Errol Morris
Ron Howard
Yasujirō Ozu
Kimberly Peirce
Steve McQueen
Andy Warhol
Roger Deakins
David O. Russell
James Gray
Terry Gilliam
Andy Serkis
Rick Baker
Alain Resnais
William Friedkin
Saul Zaentz
Woody Allen’s Manhattan
Abbas Kiarostami
Darren Aronofsky
Lars von Trier
Hayao Miyazaki
Federico Fellini
Sarah Polley
Tommy Wiseau
Brian Koppelman
Spike Lee

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cinephiliabeyond:

Dear every filmmaker, read this: an utterly brilliant series of articles by Film School Rejects’ Scott Beggs called 6 Filmmaking Tips From… It’s powerful knowledge — straight from the source.

For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:

Tuesday, July 22, 2014

I want so badly, not to be tired. The fatigue of my american dream sets in and with it, guilt. Guilt for resenting what others long for. They long to be tired, so badly.  

The eight-hour workday developed during the industrial revolution in Britain in the 19th century, as a respite for factory workers who were being exploited with 14- or 16-hour workdays.

As technologies and methods advanced, workers in all industries became able to produce much more value in a shorter amount of time. You’d think this would lead to shorter workdays.

But the 8-hour workday is too profitable for big business, not because of the amount of work people get done in eight hours (the average office worker gets less than three hours of actual work done in 8 hours) but because it makes for such a purchase-happy public. Keeping free time scarce means people pay a lot more for convenience, gratification, and any other relief they can buy. It keeps them watching television, and its commercials. It keeps them unambitious outside of work.

http://www.raptitude.com/2010/07/your-lifestyle-has-already-been-designed/